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, the thing that is really holding the economy back? if so then you had a bad week. >> first jobs report of the year. >> fourth quarter gdp numbers are down. >> the republican party can't move forward. >> government spending does actually help the economy. >> a trillion dollar stimulus bill, supposed to create jobs. >> we need to start solving the actual problem. >> we need to cut spending. >> cutting. >> cutting very popular social insurance programs. medicaid, medicare, social security, health care. >> there is another economic reason why we need reform. >> let's help to build the greatest economic engine the world has ever known. >> as congress gets ready to tackle the immigration, there will be a snag. >> the republican party can't move forward. >> doesn't want to do anything on comprehensive immigration reform. >> what would you do about immigration? >> how to deal with border security. >> first we strengthen the borders. >> they have to be reasonable how they do it. >> we define ourselves as a nation of immigrants. >> the economy is back in the spotlight. >> government does help th
economy is a high priority, so is proving his democratic credentials to his western partners. he said he would push forward with democratization. >> egypt will be a state that tolerates different and opposing opinions with peaceful transfers of power and a democratic state with everything that entails. >> merkel said she was concerned about the political violence in egypt and said dialogue was key. >> political forces can make a contribution. human rights have to be respected in egypt, and that applies most importantly to the protection of religious freedom. >> two more people died in cairo on wednesday in clashes between police and demonstrators. the death toll has now reached 50 in a week of protests. two years after a revolution swept morsi's predecessor from power. berlin has criticized his recent attempts to consolidate power is, and his opponents in the german capital were warning of a new dictatorship and egypt. >> our correspondent has been following the president's visit for us. does morsi get any of the investment and all of that that he has been looking for? >> i think you are
countries grow their economies not just through traditional assistance but also through greater trade and investment, partnerships with the private sector, better governance and more participation from women. we think this is an investment in our own economic future and i love saying this because people are always quite surprised to hear it, seven of the 10 fastest growing economies in the world are in africa. other countries are doing everything they can to help their companies win contracts and invest in emerging markets. other countries still are engaged in a very clear and relentless economic diplomacy. we should, too, and increasingly, we are. and make no mistake, there is a crucial strategic dimension to this development work, as well. weak states represent some of our most significant threats. we have an interest in strengthening them and building more capable partners that can tackle their own security problems at home and in their neighborhoods, and economics will always play a role in that. next, think about energy and climate change. managing the world's energy supplies in
had a lot of smart people who work with us here in chattanooga, and, of course, as the economy went bad, that was a downer for everyone, and then the stimulus money came along. we, fortunately, had already completed a very comprehensive business plan that showed that the system would work, and it would pay for itself over time with the savings that can be achieved from the new technology. melissa: yeah, they were giving away good money after bad for, you know, whatever project was going, so you might as well grab it and spend it on good if they spend it no matter what. geek move, awards $11,250 for moving into the city, $10,000 for expenses, and 12,000 for moving. how many show an interest in the opportunity? >> we've had a hundred applications and we'll filter through them. it is a success based on a similar success a few years ago with artists, encouraging people to move here for a specific purpose, and we have neighborhoods where houses are going wadding. geeks, that's a good term in chattanooga, urban pioneers frequently, so with a little incentive, we can bring individuals to c
from how people personally did but how does it into the economy? guest: we are seeing an economy that is recovering slowly from the crisis and recession of 2008 and 2009. we can put a number of side for a minute because that is about investment income. even over the long time horizon, we are seeing incomes rise. people are earning more money. people are starting to put people back to work. certainly, this is not a happy days are here again and everything is fine. we are not healed but it is making progress in that direction. host: take a look at a lot of factors. it look at wages and income and rental income. you look at investment income as a whole. that paints a picture of where americans are financially. guest: that's right. you can't buy the things you need if you don't have income. for some, that is a paycheck from their job or from retirees, social security benefits. or for people who have invested a lot, it might be invested -- investment income dividends. wherever it comes from, that is the core of how you buy the things you need and want. host: our guests will take a loo
and fives, i think it's going to cause... have many negative effects on the economy. >> reporter: however, if mortgage rates only move up slightly, that's likely to bring more buyers into the market. that's because many people have been waiting on the sidelines for a signal the housing market has bottomed. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> tom: as home prices have risen, so have the stock prices of many home builders, with the stock prices more vulnerable than the housing market. the yellow line, the year-over-year changes in home prices. the blue line, the home builders' stomach exchange traded fund. they move higher before home prices do, and move lower before the prices crack. megan mcgrath is with us tonight. you've looked at this relationship between the actual price of homes and the home building stocks. what does the rally in home building stocks tell you today about home prices in the month ahead. >> it is certainly telling us investors are expecting prices to continue to go up, and to go up quite a bit. prices as well as volume. there is a relationship there, too. we heard so
numbers announced yesterday. the economy added 150,000 new jobs, but the unemployment rate ticked up to 7.9%, which is what we have there on our map this was also the lead story in this morning's new york times -- on our map. this was also the lead story in this morning's new york times. patrick, explain how that works, more jobs added, but the unemployment rate goes up. guest: the economy needs to add up -- needs to create enough jobs to make up for people coming into the labour market. this month, we fell slightly short of getting there. it is worth noting, the unemployment rate has a margin for error of 0.2%. when it picks up a 0.1%, we say, it is essentially unchanged. there is a wiggle room for measurements. it is right around par. host: when these numbers come out, the numbers come out, and there is an explanation that they can be adjusted in a month or so down the road trips -- road. guest: tell us about -- as more data comes in, debris-estimate how many jobs came in, and for december, they went from 155,000 jobs to 196,000 jobs. and in november, job growth was showing 146,000 jobs
. everything we do. there is nothing else that impact our economy so directly as energy. whether it is individuals that are struggling to fill up their gas tanks, pay their electric bills, whether it is business leaders making decisions on investments based on the cost of power server farms or smelters, we recognize lower cost is better and that's what everybody is seeking. there are those who would have you believe that the best way to reduce energy's direct cost is simply to raise the direct cost so that we discourage energy use. my friends, this is a self- defeating policy. lowering the direct cost of energy is key to helping the u.s. economy recover and prosper. absolutely keep. next is clean. as we attempt to minimize indirect costs by driving up these prices, i would suggest this is a policy that is doomed to economic and practical failure. instead, we have to be aware of the impacts of every type of energy and make rational, informed decisions on what is acceptable, what needs to be mitigated, how do we do just that? our challenge here is to reduce the cost of cleaner sour
to bring down the debt. not just as a share of economy, but overall. you're right. it doesn't bring down the debt. at all. mr. speaker, that's the conflict that we face here as a people, as a country, not as republicans, not as democrats, but as a people. on the one hand, what our politicians are saying is we're going to use the money to pay down our debt. but what the reality is is that proposers are coming out today that never, ever, ever pay down a penny of debt. now, mr. speaker, if you want to see that for yourself, you can look. the president's budget each year is posted online, on the o.m.b. website. the first one he submitted, i hold the cover page here, was called a new era of responsibility. it was the first budget that the president ever submitted. but as i go through that budget, mr. speaker, what i see is projects -- proximates for 2020, for 20 -- projections for 2020, for 2030, for 2040, for 260 and for 2080 -- 20 of 6 -- 2060 and for 2080. you hear that, you have children. 2020, 2030, 2040, 2060 and 2080. and in each one of those years, according to the president's budget,
challenges facing the economies of europe, japan, china, and south korea. next on book tv. this is a little over an hour. [applause] >> okay. first of all, it is great to be back. we enjoyed our relationship that way. tokyo has been the headquarters of our asia-pacific operations for 25 years now. we enjoy a terrific relationship and a lot of different ways. one of my colleagues who is with me, doug peterson who just joined us from the city, and he is setting up. we welcome you, doug. dougie is all over the world. as such, he has lived quite a bit of time in japan himself. it's great to be with you tonight as well, doug. let's see. in terms of this whole notion of the book, by the way, a very modest title, banker to the world. when i heard of this, and i am a very close, personal friend of bill's, like everyone in this room is. and so when he was talking to me about this concept of what he wanted to write about to lessons of debt crises and all of this, i just knew that it was right in our sweet spot, what we needed to the will to do. so we were able to convince them. so no i'm not talking
the economy. think about language. nobody planned the english language. it arose spontaneously it evolved just like the french language, the russian language. there are a few languages that have two things in common, they were designed by human beings, they were planned and no one speaks them. all the languages that people speak are examples of spontaneous order. law, i know we're here in the ray burn -- rayburn office building and everybody thinks they are involved in making law. the fact is, law evolves spon spontaneously. sometimes they turned to a neighbor to settle them. some of the wisest neighbors became known as judges. that's how precedent and case law built up. it was actually much into that process that government started saying let's write it down. and intrude it and change it through legislative or skeeverd. money, most people think money is something ben bernanke prints. but it evolved because again, people had problem. how do i trade? if i have a fish and you have an apple then we have an easy trade. but if i don't like apples and you have enough fish then we have to make the tr
horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. >>> good morning. welcome back to "starting point." i'm christine romans with a look at your top stories. the bodies of dozens of young men now in the city of aleppo. it appears they were executed with shots to the head. and their bodies were dumped. this as rumblings come out of france that more intervention might be needed to end the carnage. >>> ready for hillary, even if she's not. a group of hillary clinton supporters launching a super pac. they registered last week with the federal election commission and expect to have a website up and running in the next couple of days. before secretary clinton steps down officially, our jill dougherity and elise labotte will conduct her exit interview. >>> a semi in china. a few more feet, a few more inches, this would have been the end. >>> tiger won the farmers insurance open in dominating fashion yesterday, tiger's 75th pga tour win. seven behind the record of sam snead. eighth win at torrey pines, including the 2008 u.s. op
the american economy and strengthen american families. third, creating an effective employment verification system that will prevent identity theft and and the hiring of future unauthorized workers. leslie, an approved process for admitting future workers to serve the nation's workforce needs while simultaneously protecting all workers. other bipartisan groups of senators have stood in the same spot before, trumpeting similar proposals. but we believe that this will be the year that congress finally gets this done. the politics on this issue have been turned upside down. for the first time ever, there has been more political risk in opposing immigration reform than supporting it. host: senator chuck schumer, outlining the details of the immigration reform agreement so far. here is the headline from "roll call," this morning. host: here to talk more about this story, the staff writer at "roll-call," humberto sanchez. have democrats been able to move the ball forward? caller: it appears so, but principle is a big step forward. senator schumer mentioned that. it has been tried for a couple of
economy moving again instead of what seemed to be endless partisan struggles over secondary issues? and what i wanted to speak to today was a bipartisan bill which i'm introducing which focuses on how to help create innovation focused jobs again in the united states. as you know all too well, madam president, our economic recovery has been slower than we would hope, although it's been steady, there are still far too many americans out of work. in my home state of delaware, more than 30,000. but we are building our way ba back. so the task before us is to think not just about an immediate economic crisis but to take a breath i think and instead focus strategically on the long-term fewer, to take -- long-term future, to take an account of what kind of economy we want to build for our children, for our grandchildren, for the america of today and tomorrow. the engine of our nation's greatest economic successes has always been innovation. from the light bulb to the search engine, american inventors and innovators, those who've taken risks and started companies, have created jobs by the
the economy, and worries about tomorrow's important jobs report. jobless claims rose by 38,000, more than expected. consumer spending rose slightly in december, as personal income climbed 2.6%, the highest increase in eight years, on this last trading day of january, the dow lost almost 50 points, the nasd was unchanged, and the s&p fell about four points. despite the sell off today, january was a strong month for stocks. the dow surged 6%, its best january since 1994. a 4% gain on the nasdaq, and the s&p jumped 5%. on wall street, they say a big january for stocks usually means a big year as well, it's called the "january barometer." if stocks follow history, they could be up by 20% or more. will that hold true in 2013? joining us with his thoughts on that, scott wren, senior equity strategist, wells fargo advisors. so scott, are you changing any of your forecasts for this year based on this strong january? >> well, susie, really january has been stronger than what we thought. we've had a 15, 25, year entarget out there for the s&p 500. and we're certainly reassessing that. we want to lo
. >> the state of the economy measures to we need see. >>> are you through raising tax rates? >> i don't think the issue right now is raising rates. the question is if we are serious about reducing our deficit can we stop waste in govment, can we conform healthcare programs in particular. we spend a lot more on healthcare than every other country does and we don't get better outcome. there are things we can do to reduce healthcare costs. >> and can we post loophole deductions lawyers take advantage of so they paoloer rates than bus driver or cop? if you combine those together you cannot only reduce the deficit but continue to invest in things like education and research and development that are going to help us grow. >> just a few hours from now president obama will continue his push for gun control. the heated topic on sunday talk shows. kelly wright is life in washington can more. >> president obama will travel to minneapolis the city that is making steps to curb gun violence. he will talk about the issue that can be taken on the federal level to reduce gun violence. it shows deep de visions
, looking at what's happening in business news. and jobs in the usa. >> the american economy is shrinking. employment, hoping for 160,000 new jobs to have been created. we will get the manufacturing reports later today as well. >> its 12 noon in london, 7:00 a.m. in washington, 2:00 in the afternoon in turkey. if we start with breaking news. there's been an explosion in front of the u.s. embassy in turkey and one person has been killed. there's no indication as to what caused the explosion in a neighborhood that's home to a number of foreign missions. let's get the latest from our correspondent outside the u.s. embassy. tell us what you know. >> one person killed. i have also seen reports saying possibly and two dead. it is impossible for me to get official confirmation. the place is swarming with police. police are limiting access to the immediate area where the explosion took place. i spoke to a witness earlier, an iranian gentleman who runs an office outside across from the embassy. he said that he saw a man on foot, but he was not sure, walking on foot up the road. and he saw a body b
been occupied by traders from far-off monte alban, an indication of a complex economy here. bill sanders. one of the aspects of culture that is extraordinarily variable is the economy. economy means the ownership of property and the production and distribution of goods. there are cultures and economies in which every nuclear family is self-sufficient. and then there are economies where there is considerable interdependence among the various households. one of the measures of economic complexity is just the amount of what we call division of labor -- occupational specialization. keach: archaeologists have recently discovered evidence of occupational specialization in teotihuacan, like the manufacture of clay figurines. figurines came in a variety of styles, many painted and highly detailed. thousands of these sculpted faces have been discovered. they were probably used in ritual. many are exactly the same, indicating they were mass produced in molds. across the atlantic is fez, morocco, a city that has changed little in a thousand years. here can be found an analogy for the econom
. the controversial comment from san francisco's archbishop. >> is the stock market growing while the economy is shrinking? it sounds more like a rid. sam brock takes a look in tonight's reality chicagoing. >> i'm janelle wang. america's next possible defense secretary in the hot seat. the angry questions directed at chuck hagel. an explosion in mex stow city at a major oil company leaves more than a dozen dead. world tonight is next. you're on timeout leo! some things won't last 25 years. ah! woof! some things will. some things won't last 25 years. ah! woof! some things will. >>> it was a grilling on capitol hill today. pointed questions for president obama's phenomenon knee for secretary of defense. and many of those questions came from the nominee's own party. >> janelle wang is here with our world tonight. janelle. >> former february nebraska senator chuck hagel hammered today at his senate confirmation hearing. one of the most heated exchanges came from his former friends senator john mccain who grilled hagel on his opposition to the 2007 surge of u.s. forces into iraq. >> deserves your
to economies of scale. retirement income options would be current and former employees that have little incentive to do so. our defined contribution system is not perfect, but there's other things to make it substantively better. in conclusion we can increase coverage by creating a low-cost mechanism for small employers can benefit from the east of payroll deduction to fund a retirement savings account. we can encourage employers and ways for higher employer contribution rates. third, we can limit plant them for three can encourage the adoption of annuity options. thank you. >> thank you, dr. madrian. ask around the five-minute questions. i want you to know we are looking at the leakage problem and something i've become more aware of and hopefully this committee will be looking at the shortly. let me ask you -- share this retirement plan, a key open issue is that the contribution rate should be. those who have been working on developing this plan have thought about it not for social security between employer to give you contribution was some low threshold employer match and allowing an
, so we can strengthen our economy, and strengthen our country's future. think about it. we define ourselves as a nation of immigrants. that is who we are, in our bones. the promise we see in those that come here from every corner of the globe, that has always been one of our greatest strengths. it keeps our recourse young, a key to our country on the cutting edge, and helped to build the greatest economic engine the world has ever known. after all, immigrants help to start businesses like google, and yahoo!, they created entire new industries that in turn created new jobs and new prosperity. in recent years, one in four high-tech start-ups in america were founded by immigrants. one in four new small business owners were immigrants, including right here in nevada. folks who came here seeking opportunity and now want to share that opportunity with other americans. but we all know that today we have an immigration system that is out of date and badly broken. a system that is holding us back, instead of helping us to grow our economy and strengthen our middle-class. right now, we have
enforcement in the 1970's, the men and women in the academy and then when they are out of the economy, the men and women are retrained on a monthly basis. they go to training. they go to the gun range. they are marksman. we have men and women that never pulled a service revolver. there has to be -- we do have gun-control in california. i do believe it does help, it really does help. i commend our senators and our president. newtown is a tragedy, a travesty. i have a granddaughter and there are young children who are our relatives. it does not make a difference. it could be young or old. we had a gentleman -- or rather a murderer from orange county, riverside county rather, the law enforcement gathered together. they were very emboldened and the economy in san diego. it tooks swap teams probably seven hours to get this man out. he had broken into a house and stole 30 guns, besides being a wanted murder. they did get him. i am proud of our men and women here in california. host: one more question. if the congress could do one thing, what would you like to see them do? caller: i would like to see
. two wars come to an economy in, traditional alliances fraying, are diplomatic standing damaged, and around the world people questioning america's commitments to core values and their ability to maintain our global leadership. that was my inbox on day one as your secretary of state. today conclave the world remains a dangerous and complicated place and of course we still face many difficult challenges. but a lot has changed in the last four years. under president obama's leadership we have ended the war in iraq, begun a transition in afghanistan and brought osama bin laden to justice. we have also revitalized american diplomacy and strengthen our alliances. and while our economic recovery is not yet complete, we are heading in the right direction. in short, america today is stronger at home and more respected in the world. and our global leadership is on firmer footing than many predicted. to understand what we have been trying to do these last four years, it's helpful to start with some history. last year i was honored to deliver the forest all lecture at the naval academy name
the economy at the european level. there's a trend on twitter tweeting for the -- the contractions for rajoy reject and that's on the right very well the situation here in spain. since the case, the corruption case was reported by the newspaper a few days ago. rajoy lost six points in the opinion polls in approval ratings. he is now amid 24%. that being said, the leader, the socialist leader of the opposition remains in terms of rating. so even if there's a lot of pressure on rajoy, there's now not any alternative in shape. that's the reason why the worry in the market. that's the reason for the decline today on the ibex 35. >> stephane, thanks for that. the bond, is it driven by political uncertainty, of course, but the pmi is up this morning for spain, up 47. but the employment pmi, down to 42 and that's back from the low since this time last year. >> i don't like the numbers. if you'd asked me six months ago, i would have probably said possibility of spanish growth falling off the cliff, low. 10%, maybe. now if you ask me, i'd say low but probably 30% and rising. the markets need to facto
. you know, the average investor is seeing the economy make small improvements. we're seeing improvements in the housing market, consumer spending is going up. i spoke with one trader who was a little concerned that this is an artificial rally system littlit stimulated by the fed. >> you can say we have already been here. but you can say we came from the depths of despair, we're much higher but the thing that will cause people to continue to to be concerned is it still ahead of itself. is there a correction coming because the fed created this -- manufactured this rally. >> but, brooke, you know, think of the stock market as a big old rubber band. as much as it went down in 2009, march of 2009, the low for the dow was 6500, now we're seeing it bounce back almost to 14,000. you know how that is. what goes up, i don't want to say it, brooke. >> darn that economic gravity. alison kosik, thank you very much. we want to keep talking about this. we were thinking why doesn't wall street match what we're seeing on main street. we'll talk about that with steven moore, wall street journ
in the economy for the first time since 2009. the s & p 500 is up more than 5% so far this month. very, very strong month. >> what can you say? this is a great bull market. it is. i mean, the averages went up big. transports led us, okay. could we go for a breather? it would make sense, but the fed is not stopping. it's not stopping the fed. >> s & p keeps putting out these historical numbers, a 5% gain in january and years like that, just going back to '50, 1950, 31% for the year, 27, 26, 31, 45. i mean, just -- does this year hold that potential. >> hear siegel this morning, i know there's controversy, even on this deck, about -- >> for the long term. >> he did call the top. >> he loved housing you and -- my god, i'm sorry. >> my dad's building, the society of towers. >> since the last time we had the gapes, '07, 12-month forward pe is 15. back then, it was 9. we are not overpriced necessarily, given the run that we had. >> keeps rates down, competition from bonds, not so great. i still can't get over that they preserve thafd dividend low tax rate these are bond equivalents, a lot of stock
of the economy and financial crisis, that is what we are asking about you this morning, if the financial crisis has delayed those plants for you. give us a call. robert, clinton, md., you are on, sir. caller: 401k, in the early part of november my three kids were named the beneficiaries. we did all the paperwork. here it is, since february 4, and i have not got the money yet. the company that has the 401k, first of all, you cannot find them. i work in the credit union. they would not give you any information about the company that had the 401k. here it is, the fourth, and they still have not got the money. you have got to wait a long time to get your money. host: tell us a little bit about your plans, because of the limbo you are in. what does that mean for you? caller how it means i have to be very careful about four hope -- 401k. if something happened to me, i would release the money to my kids or something like that. if they needed it right away, they could get it, but they still have not received the money. i still do not know how these things work. because of the interest, i do not know. t
this market lower? we know there's no great shakes to talk about with the economy. sure, we have a better situation in housing and corporate cash is strong. still got real pockets and real issues and uncertainties. >> no, no, there are. >> what's the catalyst? >> robert schiller was saying even the housing rally doesn't look at strong to him as people think. he's serving customers rather than speculators saying people aren't really that much more bullish on housing so even the housing thing may not have the legs that people think. >> but, you know, harry, own if the housing doesn't have the thing, it's still improving. we've still got jobless rates going down and quite frankly i think qe3 is working, and as long as we don't have job raise go below 6.5 the pump will pump up this thing like an old athlete on steroid. >> basis points are up despite qe3. that's not working. >> those are long rates only and that's because there's less risk aversion out there. people want more risky assets. this doesn't make the commercial banking system heal and get the money velocity working. >> stephanie lin
: they said that they believe gold prices will peak in 2013 because as the stock market rises, the economy improves. investors will now be looking for that safe haven investment like they used to. they are actually calling for an end to the 12 year rally in gold. we are off a little bit today. gold is down on the week. it is now down on the year. some bearish momentum continues in the gold market. overall, sentiment in the metal market is down right now. melissa: thank you so much, sandra smith. lori: let's talk more about the economy home prices. they are on the rise. november home prices rose 5.5%. so, for the year, prices rose in 19 of the 20 cities. new york the only city to see a decrease. phoenix saw the fastest gain in prices with a 22.8% in the year. stick around for jeff falk later in the hour. see that i cannot wait for that. rodney wildwood is a principal at lockwood development. you are looking at and island that is near detroit and you want to buy it and create this utopia. what would the tax policy be like because that is what i care about? >> do not fax anything you want to
be a different story. >> i would remind you that three of mind -- six of mine, three of them were the economy. and that really stunned everybody. >> and even getting into this, this is the experience of the league of women voters, they sponsored the debate in 1976 and 1984 and for the sake of transparency i was one of the reporters that ask questions in 1984. when we finished with that, they pulled out of the sponsorship and argued at the time that there was too much party interference and they said that they had no intention of becoming an accessory to the hoodwinking of the american public. i think that this is terribly tough language, but my question -- this is overstated. >> but my question to you is not as moderators but as reporters. is this something where there may be the beginning of too cozy a relationship between the parties, and the public? >> i really don't -- i did a foreign policy debate and two of my sections were the middle east. are you going to talk about foreign policy without talking about the middle east? this? >> if they don't want to do this, this is fine with me. >> o
stage. what we need are people prepared for the careers of our new economy. by 2025 we could have 20 million jobs without enough college graduates to fill them. that's why at devry university, we're teaming up with companies like cisco to help make sure everyone is ready with the know-how we need for a new tomorrow. [ male announcer ] make sure america's ready. make sure you're ready. at devry.edu/knowhow. ♪ for their annual football trip. that's double miles you can actually use. tragically, their buddy got sacked by blackouts. but it's our tradition! that's roughing the card holder. but with the capital one venture card you get double miles you can actually use. [ cheering ] any flight, anytime. the scoreboard doesn't lie. what's in your wallet? hut! i have me on my fantasy team. >>> a few relevant facts as we bring the conversation to talk about the actual policy details of the comprehensive immigration reform. one is something, arturo, you just mentioned, which is the flow has drastically decreased. 1991, annual immigration, 370,000. by 2000, up to 770,000. a lot of this has to
to the economy that we are not going to like. the headline from last week about the slowing of our gdp, it is going to be a situation where it is no longer acceptable to kick the can. so, when we talk about the need for tax reforms, i am one who says that we have got to put it all on the table. we have got to be willing to make some very difficult choices. the options if we fail to act are not something that most in this country will be satisfied with. >> i know that says you want to take a look at some of the energy initiatives here. in the house they talked about doing energy efficiency legislation puc that moving? still questionable? >> let me just start by saying that i am a firm believer in doing more in this country when it comes to efficiency. it is one of the legs of the energy tool that is absolutely critical to us. i think it is often overlooked. people look -- people look to the old technologies and there are things making news. someone joked to me once that if we could just figure out how to have a groundbreaking or ribbon cutting that involved some kind of energy efficienc
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 165 (some duplicates have been removed)